Chris Brock

A family diagnosis motivates me to make a difference for people with COPD

As a medical professional, I’m inspired every day to make a difference for COPD patients. As a doctor of pharmacy, I came to GSK motivated by the opportunity to have an impact on patient care.

Chris Brock
Chris Brock and his mom, Ruth

Currently, I lead the field medical team for GSK US Respiratory—nearly 50 employees responsible for answering medical-related questions that health care professionals have regarding GSK respiratory medicines.

But, my motivation doesn’t stop with my work. My mother, Ruth, is a 78-year-old woman living with COPD. She started smoking at the age of 12. Smoking at a young age was not uncommon in Kentucky, where she grew up. Growing up in the same area, I remember being in many smoke-filled rooms, smoke-filled homes and smoke-filled cars.

Almost twenty years ago, I noticed my mom started slowing down and having shortness of breath—having to take a break and sit on a bench when she went shopping. She was no longer making trips to the basement to do laundry or down the back steps to the garage freezer. Having a healthcare background, I saw these changes to her lifestyle, which helped lead to her diagnosis after visiting her doctor.

My mom was officially diagnosed with COPD in 2000. It was difficult for her and the entire family, and at times, she has struggled. In 2005, she had a severe exacerbation and nearly died, ending up on a ventilator.

The whole family has united around my mom. I partner with my sister who lives nearby to make sure she has the care and services she needs. I talk to my mom about her healthcare, about her doctor’s appointments, pre-and post-visit concerns, and about COPD and medications, answering her questions. I am proud of mom’s commitment to stop smoking and to focus on her health.

"My mom inspires my job at GSK. I am a medical professional, but also a son and caregiver."

Chris Brock

Today, her COPD is controlled by medicine and regular healthcare monitoring, but she is still dependent on others. This means she makes adjustments. While she still lives in her own home, she no longer drives due to the extra effort and walking that comes with having a car. 

However, because she is in control of her disease, she has been able to be there for many important milestones in our family—such as my niece getting married and family trips to church for Easter services.

My mom inspires my job at GSK. I am a medical professional, but also a son and caregiver. When I evaluate new data on COPD and the impact that data is going to have on patient care or while I am meeting with external experts discussing the applications of data to their COPD patients, I ask myself questions like “What does this data mean for people like my mom? What does this mean for her next doctor’s visit?”  

This is what drives me. Every day, I am thankful for the opportunity to support my mom and help my team be the best they can be as we work to help COPD patients live every breath.   

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