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Access to healthcare

Our humanitarian response to the Ebola outbreak

GSK's on-going efforts to strengthen healthcare infrastructure in the most affected countries.

Access to healthcare

Malaria: life cycle of a parasite

Find out more about malaria and the life cycle of the parasites that cause it.

Access to healthcare

TEDMED 2015: Art, inspired by vaccination

There are surprising similarities between an artist beginning a new work and a researcher on a quest to develop a vaccine.

Access to healthcare

TEDMED 2015: An interview with curator, Christine McNab

How does art tell the story of vaccines in a different way than other communications media?

Patients & consumers

Whooping cough: confronting the hidden risk to infants

Whooping cough can be especially serious for infants—sometimes even fatal.

How we do business

Biosecurity and pandemic preparedness

Our global commitment to helping ensure health for all is built on developing innovative medicines and vaccines and making sure they’re accessible to people around the globe.

Access to healthcare

The fight against malaria

By the time the second hand on your watch has circled its dial, a child will have died of malaria.

Patients & consumers

Eggs in manufacturing

Chickens. Where would we be without them? Well for one thing, we wouldn’t have nearly as many influenza vaccines as we need.

Our people

Beyond manufacturing in Chile and Madagascar

In 2015, GSK Vaccines sent two vaccine manufacturing teams to South America and Africa to better understand the impact of their daily work.

How we do business

Fast-tracking our response to pandemics

In the wake of global pandemics such as Ebola and Zika, there is consensus that the world needs to be better prepared.

Innovation

Welcome to the golden age of vaccine innovation

With vaccines widely available for many of the most common childhood illnesses, like measles and mumps, many people think that the golden age of vaccine development has passed. Our head of Vaccines R&D, Dr Emmanuel Hanon, thinks they’re wrong.

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